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Links between SLI, Motor Development and Literacy Acquisition in Children

Mgr. Marja Volemanová, Dis., marja.volemanova@pedf.cuni.cz

doc. PhDr. Lea Květoňová, Ph.D., lea.kvetonova@ pedf.cuni.cz

Charles University, Faculty of Education, Department of Special Education,

Magdalény Rettigové 4, 116 39 Praha 1.


Annotation

This study set out to explore the links between specific language impairment (SLI), motor development and literacy acquisition in children. We focus on motor deficits which are mostly common in children with SLI, further we look if SLI can by caused by persisting primary reflexes or if they can make the symptoms of SLI worse. After that we try to find out, if it is possible to predict SLI, already at small kids by an early development assessment and if a specific movement intervention program would be useful to help children with SLI. A significant relationship between motor impairment and speech/language impairments in children was found. Children with developmental speech/language impairments are at higher risk for reading disability than typical peers with no history of speech/language impairment (Schuele, 2004). However, we still not fully understand the causes and biological basis of SLI. Till now, there is no early developmental assessment available, which comprehensively tests both motor development and language skills. Specific movement intervention programs for children with SLI and other developmental challenges are already developed, but we miss fundamental research which shows success rate for children with SLI. There are available several case studies on this topic. Further research shall be conducted to identify children who may need special intervention even before they get the SLI diagnosis, and to search for approaches, which can help to mitigate the impairment.

Keywords

Specific language impairment (SLI); motor development; literacy acquisition; Neuro-vývojová terapie; persisting primary reflexes.


Discussion

Schuele (2004) states, that children with oral language impairment, whether or not they have concomitant speech impairment, are at great risk for reading disabilities. The reason is quite simple, if the child has difficulties with coding events in spoken language structures and in understanding spoken language, the same difficulties will appear in writing and reading. We however still not fully understand the causes and biological basis of SLI. As Hill (2001) said: „The only guaranteed conclusion that one can, currently, draw is that the deficits of children with SLI are not specific to language”. A significant relationship between motor impairment and speech/language impairments in children was found and so further research must be done to identify children who may need special intervention in time, and to search for approaches, which can help to mitigate the impairment. Within the context of reading disabilities, children with a history of SLI should be viewed as a subgroup from children with reading disabilities but no history of speech/language impairment, while intervention needs of children with SLI are potentially different from children with reading difficulties alone.


Celý článek najdete na http://pages.pedf.cuni.cz/gramotnost/3-2017/.


VOLEMANOVÁ, M.; KVĚTOŇOVÁ, L. (2017) Links between SLI, Motor Development and Literacy Acquisition in Children. Gramotnost, pregramotnost a vzdělávání , ročník 1, číslo 3, 2017. Dostupná na http://pages.pedf.cuni.cz/gramotnost/3-2017/.

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